Discover Mallorca

vineyard by the sea

February's weather has been spring-like this year, so we've been playing a bit of hooky and getting out to the trails. We started in the miniature seaside town of Port de Canonge where wooden fishing boats were anchored close to the pebble beach. This small village was all but shut down for winter and we seemed to be the only people looking for a pre-hike cortado (efforts failed).

espanyolet | linen | handmade | one-of-a-kind antique Mallorquín linen | hand painted in Mallorca, Spain | vintage | texture | color espanyolet | linen | handmade | one-of-a-kind antique Mallorquín linen | hand painted in Mallorca, Spain | vintage | texture | color

We headed west along the old postman's route which hugs the Serra Tramuntana and drops steeply into the Mediterranean. Peeking out behind the pine trees were the turquoise-colored coves that are only accessible by boat. Looking backwards, we could see the stunning coastline and Sa Foradada in the distance.

espanyolet | linen | handmade | one-of-a-kind antique Mallorquín linen | hand painted in Mallorca, Spain | vintage | texture | color espanyolet | linen | handmade | one-of-a-kind antique Mallorquín linen | hand painted in Mallorca, Spain | vintage | texture | color

After some time, we found ourselves in Banyalbufar, a small village of 500 people founded by the Moors. Some say its Arabic name means 'vineyard by the sea.' Its terraces (mar jades) were historically used for growing Malvasia wine and until recently, it was the custom for each generation to add a further tier. 

espanyolet | linen | handmade | one-of-a-kind antique Mallorquín linen | hand painted in Mallorca, Spain | vintage | texture | color

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